Gleanings from Orthodox Christian Authors and the Holy Fathers

courage

6 Entries

Have courage, faith, hope and love in God patience unto the end, to gain your immortal soul which the whole world is not equal to. REF:Elder Joseph (trans. from Greek by Elizabeth Theokritoff), "Elder Joseph the Hesychast," (Mount Athos: The Great and Holy Monastery of Vatopaidi, 1999), pp. 195 - 198



"Do not be cast down over the struggle- the Lord loves a brave warrior. The Lord loves the soul that is valiant" St. Siloan the Athonite

...you must never be afraid, if you are troubled by a flood of thoughts, that the enemy is too strong against you, that his attacks are never ending, that the war will last for your lifetime, and that you cannot avoid incessant downfalls of all kinds. Know that our enemies, with all their wiles, are in the hands of our divine Commander, our Lord Jesus Christ, for Whose honor and glory you are waging war. Since He Himself leads you into battle, He will certainly not suffer your enemies to use violence against you and overcome you, if you do not yourself cross over to their side with your will. He will Himself fight for you and will deliver your enemies into your hands, when He wills and as He wills, as it is written: 'The Lord your God walks in the midst of your camp, to deliver you, and to give up your enemies before you' (Deut. 23:14). Lorenzo Scupoli (Unseen Warfare: Chapter 15)

A wise man who offers to God honor and worship is known by Him. So he is in no way troubled if he remains unknown to all men. The task of good judgment is to incite the part of the soul where anger lies to the waging of inner warfare. The task of wisdom is to urge the mind to constant attentive watchfulness. The task of righteousness is to direct the part, in which lies lust, towards virtue and towards God. Finally, the task of courage is to govern the five senses and not let our inner man, that is the spirit, or our outer man, that is the body, be defiled through them. "Reflections on the Eight Thoughts", Abba Evagrius, "Early Fathers From the Philokalia," translated from the Russian text, "Dobrotolubiye," by E. Kadloubovsky and G.E.H. Palmer, eighth edition, (London: Faber and Faber, Ltd., 1981), pp. 113 - 114

The strength of those who wish to acquire the virtues is as follows: if they fall, let them not lose their courage, but let them be sure to make a new beginning at their endeavor. Insofar, then, as we put all our energy into practicing the virtues, let us await the Lord, showing Him a generous resolve and calling on His aid, and without fail He will strengthen us with His mercy and bestow His Grace on us in abundance, in which case we will accomplish every good easily and without exertion. Abba Moses in The Evergetinos, Book I, Vol. III/

Courage does not consist in defeating and oppressing one's neighbor, for this is overbearingness, which oversteps the bounds of courage. Nor again does it consist in fleeing terrified from the trials that come as a result of practicing the virtues; for this is cowardice and falls short of courage. Courage itself consists in persisting in every good work and in overcoming the passions of soul and body. REF:St. Peter Damaskos, "24 Discourses: Courage" - from G.E.H. Palmer, Philip Sherrard, and Kallistos Ware, Trans., "The Philokalia -- Vol. III," (London: Faber and Faber, 1984), pp. 258.





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